5th International Conference on Mathematical Modeling in Physical Sciences

May 23-26, 2016
Athens, Greece

Dimitrios Vlachos, University of Peloponnese, Department of Informatics and Telecommunications, Greece
Description: This Workshop contains all the submissions that have not been assigned in other specific Workshops. Upon the finalization of the Technical Program, submissions in the Core Workshop will be assigned to Presentation Slots according to their subject.
1
Elias Vagenas, Kuwait University, Department of Physics, Kuwait
Description: In this workshop we intend to accommodate presentations describing physics from quarks to cosmos.
2
Kalman Varga, Vanderbilt University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, United States
Description: Description: Computational nanoscience in particular and Computational Material Science in general, are rapidly developing fields providing computer simulational and theoretical background for understanding of nanoscale phenomena and nanotechnology research. Computational nanoscience overarches the whole spectrum of science including biology, physics, engineering, material science and chemistry, describing the behaviour of matter at the scale of individual atoms and molecules. This session will concentrate on novel computational approaches used in nanoscale research, including: Quantum Monte Carlo, Molecular Dynamics, Density Functional Theory, Time-Dependent Quantum Dynamics Simulations, Interaction of Nanoscale Materials and Laser Fields, Quantum Transport in Nanoscale Materials, Multiscale Modeling of Nanoscale Materials, Novel Computational Approaches, Electronic Structure Calculations and Attoscale Dynamics.
3
Dimitrios Vlachos, University of Peloponnese, Department of Informatics and Telecommunications, Greece
Description: Many differential equations, which are of interest in the physical sciences and engineering, exhibit geometric properties that are preserved by the dynamics. Discrete Lagrangian integrators, as a special type of geometric integration, has been recent interest in developing numerical schemes that preserve as many of these geometric invariants as possible. Such methods are of particular interest for problems that can be described by geometric mechanics, wherein the preservation of physical invariants such as the energy, momentum, and symplectic form can be important when simulating long-time dynamics of such systems. The aim of the session is to bring together researchers in mathematics, computer science, physical sciences, and engineering, who are interested in the broad area of numerical methods (for ordinary differential equations to partial differential equations) that preserve the underlying structure of the governing differential equations.
4
Dimitrios Vlachos, University of Peloponnese, Department of Informatics and Telecommunications, Greece
Description: Nonlinear Waves and Solitons appear in a large variety of natural and man-made systems. The interplay between the nonlinear and the linear properties of a propagation medium results in interesting properties of wave formation and dynamics. Waves with either periodic or localized profiles can be formed and undergo complex dynamics under propagation in continuous and discrete systems. Self-localized structures having the form of bright, dark and kink solitons have been observed in many experiments and their study is a field of continuously increasing research interest with respect to both theory and applications. Therefore, the study of nonlinear waves and solitons has been extended to cases of structured and inhomogeneous media, active and dissipative systems and media with nonlocal response. Advanced techniques of applied mathematics, theory of nonlinear dynamics and numerical analysis are continuously being developed and utilized, and new applications of scientific and technological interest emerge. The workshop focuses on mathematical methods and techniques as well as on applications in different fields of physics including, among others, nonlinear optics, Bose-Einstein condensates, field theory, water waves, fluid dynamics, plasma physics, lattices of coupled oscillators and biophysics.
5
Dimitrios Vlachos, University of Peloponnese, Department of Informatics and Telecommunications, Greece
Description: Although the general theory of chemistry has been developed in the first half of the 20th century, its application to realistic chemical systems had to wait until suitable high-performance computers for the solution of the huge numerical tasks associated had become available.The Workshop in Computational Chemistry aims to provide a comprehensive coverage of selected achievements in the area of theoretical and computational chemistry including applications in physics, chemistry, biology, material science etc. Contributions from both the development of fundamental theoretical methodology and computational algorithms to extensive numerical applications to specific scientific problems ranging from gas-phase to condensed phase, and to biological systems, will be included. Ab initio and semiempirical quantum mechanics, density functional theory, molecular mechanics, molecular dynamics, statistical mechanics, cheminformatics, biomolecular structure prediction, molecular design, and bioinformatics examplify the broad spectrum of contemporary computational chemistry work, which has made theory an equivalent tool and partly even a front runner in modern research methodology.
6
Dimitrios Vlachos, University of Peloponnese, Department of Informatics and Telecommunications, Greece
Description: This workshop will focus on topics of complexity with special emphasis on complex networks and multiplex networks. Complex networks are studied in many diverse fields, such as mathematics, physics, biology, sociology, economics, and computer science. In recent years, the field has seen a tremendous growth. The session will focus on recent advances in the field and will include both theoretical and applied research in complex systems. Particular emphasis will be given to the interdisciplinary nature of complex networks. A wide range of topics will be covered, such as network structure and dynamics on networks, coupled networks, spreading, synchronization, visualization, algorithms, large-scale data analysis, as well as networks of interest to biology, sociology, computer science, economics, medicine, linguistics, etc.
7
George Spyrou, Biomedical Research Foundation of the Academy of Athens, Center for Systems Biology, Greece
Description: Expectations from modern medicine are very high and this makes this field very demanding as far as the questions posed and the needed solutions are concerned, related to early diagnosis, effective therapy, accurate intervention, real time monitoring, procedures/systems/instruments optimization, error reduction and knowledge extraction. In parallel, following the explosive production of biological data concerning DNA, RNA and protein biomolecules, a plethora of questions has been raised regarding their structure, their function, the interactions between them, their relationships and their dependencies, their regulation and expression, their location and their thermodynamic characteristics. Furthermore, the interplay between medicine and biology leads to fields like molecular medicine and systems biology which are further interconnected with physics, mathematics, informatics and engineering creating new islands in the ocean of scientific interconnections like medical physics and biophysics, medical informatics, bioinformatics and computational biology, nanobiotechnology and astrobiology. We hope that this workshop will host exciting questions and intelligent algorithmic solutions in these interdisciplinary fields of medicine and biology bringing together scientists from different research fields into a creative and fertile scientific knowledge interchange.
8
Damianos Sakas, University of Peloponnese, Department of Informatics and Telecommunications, Greece
Description: Owing to masses of digital real-world data it is now possible to create and validate models of human behaviour. Of special interest are human activities connected to use of Internet - their habits, movements or likings. Simple models, basing on fundamental physical laws and phenomena can be of instant use in this case. The Workshop is also open to new techniques connected to data mining and statistics that can facilitate the process of models' input preparation as well as help to discover new non-trivial phenomena.
9
Elias Vagenas, Kuwait University, Department of Physics, Kuwait
Description: The goal of this Workshop is to bring together researchers who study the random walk, quantum random walk, and the open quantum random walk in the sense of applied computational mathematics. The organizer strongly encourages the young researchers as well as the leading figures in these areas to actively join this workshop and make a presentation. We strongly encourage submissions that allow the interaction between the random walk, quantum random walk, and the open quantum random walk, or showcase the interdisciplinary nature of stochastic processes.
10
Dimitrios Vlachos, University of Peloponnese, Department of Informatics and Telecommunications, Greece
Description: The finite element method is presently consolidated as very reliable technique used to solve partial differential equations in several areas in science and engineering, like electrical engineering, Computational Fluid Dynamics, Biomedical Modeling, and others. More recently, methods based on domains of influence, instead of finite elements meshes are also developed, like Element Free Galerkin and Smoothed-Particle Hydrodynamics. In this workshop, works related to the mathematical aspects of these methods, as well as, applications several branches of the physical sciences will be presented.
11
Dimitrios Vlachos, University of Peloponnese, Department of Informatics and Telecommunications, Greece
Description: DNA denaturation has been since long a focus for the statistical physicists and biophysicists communities. Besides being a template for fundamental biological functions such as replication and transcription, the thermally (or mechanically) driven separation of the complementary strands are currently under investigation also for their potential in designing nanodevices and molecules with technological applications. While fully atomistic descriptions of the double helix are computationally intractable due to the myriad of degrees of freedom even in short sequences, theoretical investigations usually start from mesoscopic Hamiltonians incorporating nonlinear effects and interactions at the level of the nucleotide units. This workshop discusses the state of the art models for DNA molecules with emphasis on its dynamical and equilibrium properties.
12
Dimitrios Vlachos, University of Peloponnese, Department of Informatics and Telecommunications, Greece
Description: This workshop concentrates on advancing coupled climate and Earth system models for climate change projections at global-to-regional spatial scales and temporal scales spanning decadal to centennial. Submissions must focus on research that improves representations in specific model components to achieve credible high-resolution climate simulations that address the variability and predictability of climate system changes and directly impact societal issues pertaining to future energy use and technology.
13
Elias Vagenas, Kuwait University, Department of Physics, Kuwait
Description: After the confirmation of the gravitational waves detected by LIGO a new field has officially been created: "Gravitational Wave Astronomy". Thus, this workshop is open for all people interested in the field of gravitational waves and in particular to those working on mathematical relativity, numerical relativity, source modeling, astrophysical sources, data analysis, and detector development. Furthermore, we expect experts working in astronomy and computational astrophysics to address open questions in gravitational-wave astronomy.
14
Elias Vagenas, Kuwait University, Department of Physics, Kuwait
Description: This Workshop focuses on Space physics which is the study of plasmas as they occur naturally in the universe. The topics this Workshop will accommodate will be heliophysics, the solar wind, planetary magnetospheres and ionospheres, auroras, cosmic rays, and synchrotron radiation. Furthermore, space weather will be an important part in this Workshop.
15
Dimitrios Vlachos, University of Peloponnese, Department of Informatics and Telecommunications, Greece
Description:
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